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How much is a Simoleon worth in real life?

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Sims need Simoleons to buy stuff, pay their utility bills, and so on. If you want to upgrade your house, you need  more Simoleons, just as in real life. As a result, your Sims need to get a job, and sometimes side-hustle or take better care of their money tree in order to get their hands on more Simoleons.

But what if you want to translate the Sims 4 currency into real-life currency?

There’s an interesting tweet from 2016 suggesting that 1 Simoleon was worth $153.33 USD. Taking into account the inflation rate, $1 in 2016 is worth $1.12 in 2021. In other words, 1 Simoleon is now worth $171.73.

However, if we compare the prices for various items in the game, the 1: $171.73 ratio doesn’t make much sense today.

Simoleon worth over time

In The Sims 3, the lowest price for a new car was 950 Simoleons. Back in 2013, a cheap new car was about 10,000-15,000$. This means that a Simoleon was worth $10.53.

In The Sims 4, the cheapest house you can build costs around 20,500 Simoleons. In 2021, the cheapest house you can build in the US is around $150,000. So, this means that a Simoleon is worth $3,075.

On the other hand, in Sims 4: Get Together, a croissant costs 3 Simoleons. In real-life, a croissant at Starbucks costs around $3. A cappuccino in The Sims 4 costs 6 Simoleons, while at Startbucks it’s $3 to $4.

Conclusion

Establishing a clear Sims 4 Simoleon to real-life dollar ratio is a difficult task. It seems that the game uses random price tags which makes finding the real-life equivalent pretty much impossible. Finding the right conversation rate is not an easy task.

If you compare the price of low cost items in The Sims 4, you’ll see they are generally more expensive in the real world. However, if you compare the price of high cost items in the game, you’ll notice they are cheaper in real-life. For example, the property prices are very low in the world of the Sims. As you can see, making a comparison to real-life costs is problematic.

Do you have other conversation rate suggestions? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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